An important consideration for anyone cutting the cord is having a stable connection to the internet

An important consideration for anyone cutting the cord is having a stable connection to the internet on all your TVs and devices. People tend to utilize WiFi for most of their devices so making sure a home network has good Wifi coverage is crucial. Unfortunately, WiFi is subject to interference and can make it difficult to have good WiFi coverage This article will explain how to set up WiFi access points on each floor and have a stable connection between them and your main router using Ethernet. I’ll go into detail on router placement, the basic configuration of devices, how to connect them via Ethernet, and even how to run an Ethernet connection between floors through the walls in your home. Unfortunately, many Internet providers bring the signal into the lowest point of your home. That means it’s on the first floor or worse, the basement. As we’ve said before, you want to place a strong signaled WiFi access point higher in the home because WiFi Signals propagate out and down. Internet access entering through the basement can cause many headaches when it comes to your network. If your Internet access is from a cable TV provider, you don’t want many splitters degrading the signa...

In The Lab: The Netgear XS724EM, a 24-port 2.5G/5G/10GBase-T Switch

For a special occasion, and with what looked like a pricing error, I decided to splash out on a 10GBase-T switch for my testing lab. Coming in at almost £800, reduced from £1900, this beast was not cheap but surprisingly below my personal cost-per-port to get into the 10-gigabit game. Rather than review the switch (how do you review a switch anyway? ), I just want to go through what this thing is and what I can do with it. Plus some rough point-to-point bandwidth speeds. One of my personal crusades in recent years has been to push 10-gigabit networking – specifically Ethernet over copper (10GBase-T) – into a price range that is more amenable to home users. For a long time, this technology has been priced for commercial and enterprise: upwards of $100 per port for the switch and $100-$200 per port for the add-in cards. This is partly because the technology has a lot of enterprise bells and whistles, such as QoS, but also there has never been a big drive for more than gigabit Ethernet in the home. Recently this changed somewhat. After a decade of Intel’s 10G silicon on the shelves, Aquantia came in and started offering add-in cards below $100 – and not only for 10G but also the ne...