With harvest now ended for the year, small-scale farmers who grow chestnuts in California concentrate on marketing their crops. Stanislaus County farmer Joe Avila, who owns The Chestnut Farm in Modesto with his wife, Jenni, says his harvest is complete and he expects to sell out before the Thanksgiving holiday. “The production of the chestnut crop this year was very nice,” Avila said. “Volume-wise, it was a little smaller, but percentages on the size of the chestnuts was up from last year quite a bit, so we’re happy with that. Chestnut quality looks great; they’re peeling well and they’re sweet.” Avila said he started growing chestnuts in the early 1980s, due to fond memories of eating them as a boy growing up in the Azores Islands of Portugal. He said he initially planted three dozen trees and today grows 5 acres of chestnuts. He harvested 9 tons of chestnuts this season, including the European Colossal variety—a hybrid of Japanese and European varieties resistant to chestnut blight, which virtually destroyed the native American chestnut in the mid-1900s. The family also grows an accompanying pollinator, the Nevada chestnut. Avila said...